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Rio Travel Passes

Rio de Janeiro Beach Hop

Rio de Janeiro Beach Hop

Travel Pass from Rio de Janeiro to Rio de Janeiro (via Ilha Grande & Paraty) - Frequency: Daily Departures - Minimum No. of People: 1 - Recomm...

US$125.00

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Foz to Rio Bus Hop

Foz to Rio Bus Hop

Travel Pass from Foz do Iguacu to Rio de Janeiro (via Sao Paulo, Paraty, Ilha Grande) - Frequency: Daily Departures - Minimum Travellers: 1 - R...

US$290.00

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Samba to Tango Hop

Samba to Tango Hop

Travel Pass from Rio de Janeiro to Buenos Aires (via Iguazu Falls) - Frequency: Daily Departures - Recommended Minimum Duration: 6 days - Route: ...

US$420.00

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Cachaca to Vino Hop

Cachaca to Vino Hop

Rio de Janeiro to Buenos Aires TransLink Hop via Ilha Grande, Paraty, Sao Paulo, Florianopolis, Foz do Iguacu & Puerto Iguazu. - Frequency: Daily D...

US$597.00

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The Pantanal Hop

The Pantanal Hop

Travel Pass from Rio de Janeiro to Foz do Iguacu via Ilha Grande, Paraty, Sao Paulo, Pantanal, Bonito. - Frequency: Daily Departures - Suggested ...

US$720.00

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Rio Transfers

Ilha Grande Return Transfer

Ilha Grande Return Transfer

Rio de Janeiro to Ilha Grande Return Transfer - Book Online Now! - Frequency: Daily Departures - Minimum No. of People: 1 - Recommended Minimum...

US$64.00

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Rio de Janeiro to Paraty Transfer

Rio de Janeiro to Paraty Transfer

Book your transfer from Rio to Paraty online! Van Transfer from Rio de Janiero to Paraty (Door to Door) The easy way to get to Paraty from Rio ...

US$40.00

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Rio Carnival Products

Rio Carnival Group Tour 2019

Rio Carnival Group Tour 2019

CARNIVAL GROUP TOUR PACKAGE 2018 - 6 days / 5 nights (also available is a 3 night package, just ask us!) Starts - Friday 1st of March Ends - Wedn...

US$935.00

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Sambadrome Parade Tickets

Sambadrome Parade Tickets

SECTOR 12 or 13 Cheap Sambadrome Tickets or upgrade to better seats. Tickets available for the Sunday 15 February or the Monday 16th February Para...

US$55.00

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Participate in the Carnival Parade

Participate in the Carnival Parade

This is your chance to not only go to Rio Carnival, but also to be part of it. You will receive your very own costume, then join one of the performing...

US$346.00

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Categories

August,24 2014

Guide to Rio's Famous Beaches

Guide to Rio's Famous Beaches

Photo's of the famous beaches of Rio de Janiero, with their dramatic city and mountainous backgrounds, certainly draw many visitor's to Rio. Before your trip to Rio, there are a few things you should know about the city's beach culture, and our Rio Beach Guide will give you a basic rundown of where to go, what to wear, what to do, and safety.

Copacabana beach during Rio Carnival

On the weekends, holidays, and especially during Carnival - Rio's beaches can get quite crowded; but at the same time they become very vibrant, a great way to cool down, and the perfect escape from the city's busy streets.  

Where to go?

Rio's most famous beaches - Copacabana, Ipanema and Leblon - are all located in Rio's Zona Sul (south zone). The city of Rio also has other beaches such as Flamengo and Botafogo, but because these are situated on the bay, they are not as nice as the three famous aforementioned beaches which are situated on the open sea, making them cleaner and the sands white. 

City and mountainous background

The length of Copacabana, Ipanema and Leblon spans an almost uninterrupted 8.5kms, so the first thing to do is to figure out which part of the beach you wish to go. To help you, the beaches are divided by big yellow numbered lifeguard stands called postos which are numbered to help orientate yourself. There are 12 postos which subdivide the 3 beaches with invisible borders. Not only do the Postos offer lifeguards, toilets and change rooms, some also offer a cultural orientation for the types of people you will find in their proximity.

Copacabana - Postos 1 to 6 - the 4km beach begins at an area called Leme, which is where you will find Posto 1, and this is also an area of surfing waves. Copacabana's beach is perhaps more touristy than its neighbours, and also more crowded with lots of people practicing beach sports (football, volleyball, etc).

Football on the beches of Rio

Many visitors to Rio find themselves between Posto 2 and Posto 3, probably because that is where the Metro stop Cardeal Arcoverde allows quick access to, but also it is the area where you find the world famous Copacabana Palace Hotel. There is more night activity around the Copacabana beach, due to the bright Kiosks where people hang-out, listen to live music and have a drink.

Ipanema - Postos 7 to 9 - hosts a young and hip crowd starting from Posto 7 which is around the rocks of Arpoador. Waves are good here attracting many surfers, and you can also walk on the rocky headland which is a great spot to watch the sunset. Between Posto 8 & 9 there is a noticeable Gay crowd, easily recognised by rainbow flags and sculptured men, and posto 9 attracts a smart fashionable and pretty crowd.

Leblon - Postos 10 to 12 - the boundary between Ipanema and Leblon is marked by a not so pretty canal, but there are pretty people around Posto 10. Leblon is where the rich and famous go to hang-out on the beach, and they are mostly seen around Postos 10 & 11. Apart from this area, mostly families populate Leblon beach.

What Brazilians wear to the beach

What Brazilians Wear

The locals wear as little as possible, but naked is illegal!. For the gals, that means itty-bitty string bikinis (appropriately called 'fio dental' in Portuguese which means dental floss) - all women of all sizes wear them so if you get yourself one then you don't have to worry about standing out. Guys can get by with a pair of board shorts, but the Brazilian version of speedos called 'sunga's' are the accessory of choice for locals, so if you are game to join them, grab a pair!  Havaianas are the popular footwear and you can buy these cheaper from supermarkets rather than the Havaiana shops, although range will be limited in supermarkets.

What to Do?

Rio's locals sit close together, so do not be surprised if someone parks him or herself right next to you - personal space is different in Rio's beach culture. Most people when they get to the beach either rent a beach chair or bring a 'kanga' (sarong) to lie on.  

Get a beach chair and unbrella

You will find beach chairs and umbrellas are available for rent all along the beach, and most locals will prefer to sit on these. If you want to do the same, you can just go sit on one, and someone will come along later to collect your money, which should be about 10 to 15 Reais for as long as you are there. If you do not wish to pay for a chair, then we suggest you lay out on a kanga (sarong). Take your own if you have one, or purchase one right on the beach from the vendors patrolling around. The Kanga's with the Brazilian flag printed on them also make great souvenirs and gifts for your friends back home.  

Sunset on Copacabana

Food & Drink Vendors

Take advantage of the hundreds of food and drink vendors who make their way up and down the beach, hawking everything such as cold beers, iced teas, baked cheese sticks, sandwiches and empanadas.  The beaches are the perfect environment to get yourself a chilled coconut to sip from and there are also little cabanas on the beach to buy food and drinks, including strong Caipirinhas.

 

Safety on Beaches

Be aware of the water conditions - although it may look nice, it can sometimes surprise you. There are strong currents, but luckily there are also lifeguards located throughout the beach during daylight hours.

Brazilian Beach Culture

Don't leave your belongings unattended, even for a short swim. Keep personal items, jewelry, watches, purses and any other valuables locked away in your hostel or hotel. Be aware of some locals who like to chat to visitors innocently while their friends take your things!

Unfortunately you need to expect to be hassled by people trying to sell you stuff while you are on the beach, such as hats and sunglasses. Best thing to do if you do not want to buy anything is say a quick polite 'no obrigado'  (or 'no obrigada' if you are female, meaning no thanks) and then do not make further eye contact. Looking at them will make the vender think you are interested and can be talked into the sale.

Beaches deserted at night

It is not wise to be on the beaches at night because it is a popular place for robberies. After the sun goes down you will not find many people actually on the sandy areas, except for those playing beach sports in the floodlit areas.
Walking along the boardwalk footpath close to the street is very popular at night, as is stopping for a drink at one of the many kiosks you find there, but stay in the well lit and populated areas. The best advice is to stay off the sand at night all together, unless at a large beach party.
On hot Rio nights it may be tempting to go swimming, but we strongly encourage you not to! The water conditions get rough after nightfall.

Green Toad Bus

+55 21 3942 0003

Florianopolis - Brazil

 
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